My First Superhero

10456005_10201593166624575_4015815902436540282_n

“What are you watching?

This question from my father, as innocent as it seems, makes me lovingly cringe.

“It’s a show Dad.”

“Is it a movie?” he’ll say, sitting next to me on the sofa and squinting at the TV. More internal cringing.

“No Dad, it’s a show.”

“What’s it called?”

Here’s where things get tricky, because A) some of the more nerdy shows I watch have weird names and B) my dad, as a rule, will always mishear the title. I can mumble or enunciate, it doesn’t matter. I call this Dad’s Third Law of Hilarious Misinterpretation.

“Doctor What?” he’ll ask quizzically.

Or,

“Firebug? Fire kya?”

Or,

“Battle Galacticus?”

There is a lot of affectionate eye-rolling and gritted teeth and repeating myself until he gets it right. Once the title is established, he’ll try watching for a few minutes. He asks questions, tries to follow along. But inevitably, after a max of 8 minutes (sometimes 10 if there are commercials), he’ll shake his head and say “this is weird. You watch weird shows,” before retreating behind his newspaper. I call this Dad’s Second Law of Attention Span.

God bless him, he does try.

Read the rest of this entry »


Humans of the World

Humans of New York, one of our favorite photoblogs, was started in November 2010 by photographer Brando Stanton. What started as an effort to take candid portraits on the streets of New York – accompanied by short & intimate interviews with every day people – has turned into a global phenomena. Brandon is currently on 50 day, international trip in partnership with the United Nations, in an effort to gather portraits & stories and raise awareness for the Millennium Development Goals- so far he’s visited Iraq & Jordan and is soon to visit the Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Vietnam & Haiti.

Follow Brandon as he continues his tour through his blog, Facebook or Instagram.

“We just want to be together and not be afraid.” (Erbil, Iraq)


Jump, Pray, Write

IMG_3815

Two and a half years ago, I left my financially comfortable global marriage for an expired passport and economic uncertainty. It was the saddest and bravest decision I’ve ever made. The US economy teetered in the worst recession since the Great Depression. There was no alimony, and I had not worked in twelve years.

The fear of “what ifs” loomed in monstrous proportions. I had no soft spots to land and no deep-pocketed family members to help me start over. Leaving meant leaping into a terrifying yet potentially poetic abyss.

Marriage had furled me tight. I couldn’t celebrate my complexities, and I longed for a different rapport with my spirituality. I felt like a fat and undesirable failure, and how I experienced my identity within the relationship wasn’t what I wanted to be out in the world.

When you find that you can’t locate yourself in a significant part of your known world, you have a spiritual obligation to make a new map. I jumped wide and fierce into the unseen with no compass.

I started an anonymous, now defunct blog. I had one published book and an anthology essay out in the world, but this secret writing felt unusually invigorating. My hands shook with unspoken truths so badly that I had find release. The words dribbled from my fingers as their own life forms. The writing was raunchy, irreverent, and always deeply personal.

I wrote about everything and everyone, although identities were kept secret. I admitted how I felt undesirable and then documented with questionable discretion the men who proved otherwise. But in those debilitating moments of post-divorce trauma, when nothing seemed to exist except fear and self-loathing, writing offered sanity and empowerment.

Sometimes, the best survival kit is one that includes only hope, prayer, and writing.

Read the rest of this entry »


This is Peace, Too

huda

When my husband, Hadi, and I lived in Guadalajara, Mexico, I volunteered at an internado for girls. It wasn’t quite an orphanage. Most of the children had a parent or a grandparent who were unable to care for them due to poverty or addiction. I believed then that my motivations for volunteering were selfless. It had nothing to do with the loneliness of living in a foreign country or being away from family for the first time. I simply had time on my hands, and I wanted to make a difference.

I did not know then that I was stepping into a bottomless pit of need, that the longer I volunteered there the more layers and layers of things I had no power to fix I’d uncover. The homes the girls went back to on the weekend were broken, the discipline system at the internado was broken, their schools were broken, their friendships with each other were broken, their shoes were broken, and their hearts had been broken time and time again.

During those years, I felt guilty for everything. My bed, my space heater, my shower, my clothes, my washer and dryer, my childhood, my education, my parents, my husband. I had so much. Too much.

Read the rest of this entry »


#MuslimYouthRising on YouTube

Qias Omar

Qias Omar

Youth are using YouTube to express creative narratives of identity and belonging, often with a focus on satire and comedy. We want to introduce you to a few channels we enjoy.

What Muslim entertainers are YOU watching on YouTube?

Sister Randomina/Hijandom

One of the more vivid young female Muslim personalities on YouTube:

fouseyTUBE

California’s Yousef Saleh Erakat has a 501K following!

 

and Afghan-American Qias Omar!


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,434 other followers