Never met a Muslim? Now you can meet 47

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Never met a Muslim? Now you can meet 47 in our two groundbreaking anthologies acclaimed by media worldwide:

Love, InshAllah: the Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Womenand

Salaam, Love: American Muslim Men on Love, Sex, & Intimacy.

Meet our 47 fantastic contributors here, and hundreds more who wrote diverse, divergent & provocative pieces for our site for four years after the books were published, below.

Would you like us to talk to your class, MSA, book club, interfaith group, etc.? Contact us here.

Stay tuned for an exciting new project launching in 2017, inshAllah!

Until then – keep sharing your stories. Your voice matters.


Smash the Monolith

Love, InshAllah & Salaam, Love editor Nura Maznavi recently gave a TEDx talk at the University of Chicago’s TEDx conference “The Incredible Unknown.” Nura talks about smashing the monolithic perception of Muslim women by sharing stories of something that transcends all boundaries: love.


Friday Love: Muslima

Muslima

Check out the International Museum of Women’s phenomenal new exhibition Muslima featuring art, voices and stories from Muslim women around the globe.

And here’s Love InshAllah‘s op-ed commemorating International Women’s Day:

Muslim Women Take Back the Mic

Everyone has an opinion about Muslim women, even those — especially those — who have never met one.

As Muslim women born and raised in America, we are tired of hearing everyone — politicians, pundits, men and women of other faiths (or those not adhering to any faith) — talk about Muslim women without ever stopping to listen to what we have to say about our lives.

The narrative about Muslim women spun by others — and propagated in the media and popular culture — as silent, submissive and oppressed, is one that neither of us recognize in ourselves, the women in our families, or the women we have met over the years through our work within the Muslim community both in the United States and abroad. (Ayesha as a development consultant and Nura as an attorney.)

When we raise our voices to tell our own stories, we are silenced. We are either dismissed as outliers — educated and upper class Western-raised Muslim women with no grasp of the reality of “real” Muslim women — or brainwashed, because how could any intelligent woman defend Islam or call herself Muslim? In many cases, our experiences are negated or dismissed as inauthentic by virtue of comparison to the circumstances of some women in other countries, e.g., burqa-clad women in Afghanistan or child brides in Yemen.

What about child brides in Yemen?
 
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